Three-toed Sloth

It is finally Friday, and we would like to celebrate our followers by taking species requests on #FollowerFriday. Today’s public choice is a sloth!

Colour me in so we can hang out!”

“Happy Friday everyone. I am a Three-toed sloth and yes, you’ve guessed it, I have three toes on my hands and feet. Lots of people will be wishing they are going out tonight, but why not hang out with me and take it easy in a tree. It’s time to enjoy the slow life I live for now, hang in there…I do have some questions for you:

1. How often do I eat?
2. Which way does my fur grow?
3. How long do I sleep a day?

Message us for any species you would like to see!

#homeschool #homeschoollife #education #homeschooling #onlineeducation #teaching #school #friday #teachingfromhome #stayathome #sloth

Triceratops

It’s #ThrowbackThursday and we would like to meet our old friend who just to live on Earth

Colour me in to preserve me!”

“Hello, I am I triceratops and I am a dinosaur. I was on the Earth about 65 million years ago (Creatceous period). I am one of the most easily recognizable dinosaurs due to my large body, unique frill and three horns. I needed these horns to try and protect myself from the Tyrannosaurus Rex which lived during the same period. I have some questions for you:

  1. What did I eat?
  2. How big was I when I was fully grown?
  3. Where was my first fossil found?

#homeschool #homeschoollife #education #homeschooling #onlineeducation #teaching #school #humpday #teachingfromhome #stayathome #triceratops #dinosaur

Pangolin

#WeirdWildlifeWednesday and we would like you to meet our strange friend.

Colour me in so I can find some tasty food!”

“Hello, I am a pangolin, and I am often called a scaly anteater. I am the only mammal with scales on my skin! I have a really long tongue which I love to catch my food with. If I get scared, I quickly curl up into a ball to protect myself. I have some questions for you:

1. Where do I live?
2. What do I like to eat?
3. Do I like to come out at night (nocturnal) or the day (diurnal)?”

#homeschool#homeschoollife#education#homeschooling#onlineeducation#teaching#school#humpday#teachingfromhome#stayathome#pangolin

Tarsier

Today is #TerrestrialTuesday! Terrestrial simply means anything that lives on land, so today we would like you to meet our tree friend.

Colour me in so I can climb!

“Happy Tuesday everyone! I am a Tarsier and I am a primate. I got my name from the very long bones in my feet! I have HUGE eyes, perfect for my nocturnal lifestyle, which means I am only awake when it is dark outside. I only live in trees; it is very comfy for me! Some questions for you:


1. Which country do I live in?
2. What do I eat?
3. How big am I when I am fully grown?”

#homeschool#homeschoollife#education#homeschooling#onlineeducation#teaching#school#mondaymorning#teachingfromhome#stayathome#wildlifecraftclub

Axolotl

It’s #MarineMonday and we would like to introduce you to our marine friend.

Colour me in so I can swim!

“Hello! I’m an #Axolotl. There’s aren’t many of me left in the wild. I don’t really like water pollution where I live. I just love to swim and I’m very well adapted. I have a very cool skill: I can’t regrow my own limbs! I have some questions for you to find out…

•🏡 Where do I live?
• 🍽 What do I eat?
•💚 How can you help me and my friends?

As a bonus question, see if you can find pictures of what my babies look like!”

Answers will be revealed on Saturday!

#homeschool #homeschoollife #education #homeschooling #onlineeducation #teaching #school #mondaymorning #teachingfromhome #stayathome

International Women’s Day 2020

International Women’s Day 2020: Life and Environmental Science Researchers

Dr Catherine Gutmann Roberts is a postdoctoral researcher in fish migration ecology. Postdoc researching migration ecology and phenology across a range of taxa, but with a keen interest in freshwater and diadromous fishes. She is interested in all aspects of aquatic ecology and conservation, enjoys working with citizen scientists (anglers) to collect data and samples. She also has a passion for science communication and public engagement in research.

Victoria Dominguez Almela is assessing the ‘dispersal-enhancing’ traits of non-native fish species in their invasion range to quantify the importance of trait plasticity in driving natural rates of diffusion. Progress to date has included completion of swimming performance using flume tanks (as shown in the picture) and functional response experiments. Results are promising, but work is still in progress!

Professor Amanda Korstjens and her mother pictured here, who was 78 years young when she went to Indonesia on a Student Environment Research Team (SERT) training trip with Bournemouth University students. Her research topics include: I. How climate and human disturbance influence primate distribution patterns and survival; 2. Eco-tourism, conservation, disease transmission and human-wildlife conflicts; 3. The evolution of mating strategies and female sexual signals, esp. in red colobus monkeys. You can find all her brilliant research activities on the Landscape Ecology and Primatology (LEAP) website: https://go-leap.wixsite.com/home

Professor Anita Diaz and some of the Purbeck Wildlife Student Environment Research Team (SERT) are based at Bournemouth University. The SERT project helps research what habitat management most helps wildlife conservation on the Purbeck Heaths National Nature Reserve. It runs each year, mentored by Anita Diaz and working in close collaboration with the National Trust. They also collaborate with a range of other conservation organisations including the RSPB and Back from the Brink.

The Nature Volunteers website https://www.naturevolunteers.uk/  is a HEIF funded project that connects people wishing to volunteer to help nature with volunteering opportunities offered by conservation organisations all over the UK. It is also a research tool that helps us, and conservation organisations understand what people who are new to nature volunteering are looking for and what encourages their engagement. ​

Dr Alice Hall is a postdoctoral researcher working at Bournemouth University. She specializes in marine biology and ecological engineering. Her work focuses on building multifunctional structures which can perform their primary function and also provide suitable habitat for marine life.  She is currently working on an Interreg Atlantic Project called 3DPARE which is 3D printing concrete artificial reef units for use in the Atlantic region.

Katie Thompson is doctoral researcher in African Elephant conservation. Her research focuses on ecosystem level conservation environmental education and sustainable development. Ultimately, she aims to use this knowledge to facilitate improving long term management of wildlife and their natural habitats, through high impact research and outreach activities. 

Professor Genoveva Esteban’s research interests focus on biodiversity at the microbial level in order to understand and predict the functioning of aquatic systems by characterising microbial biodiversity at local and regional scales, and by defining the role played by microbes in the natural environment and food webs. Her research is two fold: (1) she leads a successful programme that aims to link science with conservation through research on `cryptic’ biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems; (2) characterisation at molecular and morphological levels of the rare aquatic microbial consortia that thrive in wet woodlands, some being new species to science. She is also a dynamic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Ambassador.

Jessica Bone is a marine biologist and Research Assistant for the Marineff project and based at Bournemouth University (UK) where she also studied both my Bachelors and Masters degrees in marine ecology. She has enjoyed the interdisciplinary element of Marineff as it has given her the opportunity to learn more about engineering and materials science which has complemented my contributions in designing the Marineff pool. She is also responsible for the Marineff newsletter. Having grown up and studied on the south coast of the UK, she champions British marine wildlife and has a soft spot for the intertidal invertebrates. She is also a secretary for the Poole Harbour Study Group.

Environmental change on the Isle of Wight: past, present and future

Event information from Eventbrite: tinyurl.com/sxzpskv

Description

The recent designation of the Isle of Wight as a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve is recognition of the quality and magnificent diversity of the Island’s landscape and habitats and is testament to the stewardship of Islanders over millennia.

For 100 years, members of the Isle of Wight Natural History & Archaeological Society (IWNHAS) have recorded the wildlife and investigated the geological and archaeological contexts that make this Island so special.

While it is important to reflect on the past, the current ‘climate emergency’ has focused our attention on the present and the future. It is therefore fitting that we celebrate the Centenary of the Society with a conference that enables us to learn, understand and discuss how we can protect the Island’s wildlife and landscape in an era of unprecedented environmental change.

Tickets £12 (inc. lunch and refreshments)

To reduce our environmental impact, the buffet lunch will be meat-free

Conference themes

• Climatic change: past, present and future trends

• Species Invasions: history and horizon scanning

• Land use and landscape

• Habitats and species

Speakers

To help us achieve our conference aims we have invited local speakers and national experts with knowledge of the Island. There will be plenary sessions for open discussion associated with each theme:

1. Prof. Juliet Brodie, Natural History Museum London, National University of Galway

2. Clive Chatters, Hampshire & Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust

3. Dr Emilie Hardouin, Bournemouth University

4. Prof. Stephen Hawkins, Southampton University, UK Marine Biological Association

5. Prof. Helen Roy MBE, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford

The provisional full programme is available here

Registration

Registration on the day opens at 08:15am with the event starting promptly at 09:00am (please allow yourself enough time to Register).

Field trip

On Sunday 5th April 10:00-15:00, the IWNHAS will lead a mini-BioBlitz in the vicinity of Bembridge Harbour, with the hub based at Brading Haven Yacht Club, Embankment Road, St Helens, PO33 1XQ.

All are welcome.

Individuals and groups will lead excursions 10:00-12:30 to record as many different plant and animal species as possible. There will be summing-up of the days’ finds at 14:00. Sunday lunch may be booked at the club on 01983 872289 and there is a bar available. More details will be added soon.

Submit a poster or exhibition

Posters on the conference theme or more broadly on the natural history of the Isle of Wight are warmly invited. For posters, please download the Abstract submission form here.

Organisations interested in bringing small table-top exhibitions, that promote the conservation and management of the Island’s environment and natural history, should contact The Society on iwatchwildlife@gmail.com.

TRAVEL INFORMATION:

There is limited car parking available at The Riverside Centre. If parking at the Centre, you will need to enter your vehicle registration onto the touchscreen in Reception upon arrival.

TRAVELLING TO THE ISLE OF WIGHT:

Wightlink Ferries https://www.wightlink.co.uk/

Red Funnel Ferries https://www.redfunnel.co.uk/en/

Hovertravel https://www.hovertravel.co.uk/

PAY & DISPLAY CAR PARKING IN NEWPORT:

Seaclose Recreation Ground Newport, PO30 2QS- Long Stay 8am to 6pm

Newport Harbour Newport, PO30 2QR – Long Stay 8am to 6pm

County Hall Complex Newport, PO30 1UD – Long Stay 8am to 6pm

Little London Sea Street, Newport, PO30 5BW – (if arriving and parking before 8:30am, early bird all day parking tickets are available at £3.00)

PUBLIC TRANSPORT:

Island Buses – https://www.islandbuses.info/

Nearest bus stop:

Fairlee Road, Newport – served by the No.5 & 9

NEARBY ACCOMMODATION:

Premier Inn –https://www.premierinn.com/gb/en/hotels/england/isle-of-wight/newport/isle-of-wight-newport.html

One Holyrood B&B –https://www.oneholyrood.co.uk/bb-rooms/

Newport Quay Hotel B&B – https://newportquayhotel.co.uk/

Travelodge – https://www.travelodge.co.uk/hotels/338/Newport-Isle-of-Wight-hotel?WT.tsrc=GHA_Organic&utm_campaign=GHA_Newport%2C%20Isle%20of%20Wight&utm_medium=GHA_Organic&utm_source=google

For additional places to stay on the Island please visit https://www.visitisleofwight.co.uk/accommodation

OTHER:

Further details on the Conference and BioBlitz will be made available here

Membership details of the Isle of Wight Natural History & Archaeological Society are available here

To our environmental impact there is no need to print your ticket for the event and the buffet lunch will be meat-free.

Description

The recent designation of the Isle of Wight as a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve is recognition of the quality and magnificent diversity of the Island’s landscape and habitats and is testament to the stewardship of Islanders over millennia.

For 100 years, members of the Isle of Wight Natural History & Archaeological Society (IWNHAS) have recorded the wildlife and investigated the geological and archaeological contexts that make this Island so special.

While it is important to reflect on the past, the current ‘climate emergency’ has focused our attention on the present and the future. It is therefore fitting that we celebrate the Centenary of the Society with a conference that enables us to learn, understand and discuss how we can protect the Island’s wildlife and landscape in an era of unprecedented environmental change.

Tickets £12 (inc. lunch and refreshments)

To reduce our environmental impact, the buffet lunch will be meat-free

Conference themes

• Climatic change: past, present and future trends

• Species Invasions: history and horizon scanning

• Land use and landscape

• Habitats and species

Speakers

To help us achieve our conference aims we have invited local speakers and national experts with knowledge of the Island. There will be plenary sessions for open discussion associated with each theme:

1. Prof. Juliet Brodie, Natural History Museum London, National University of Galway

2. Clive Chatters, Hampshire & Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust

3. Dr Emilie Hardouin, Bournemouth University

4. Prof. Stephen Hawkins, Southampton University, UK Marine Biological Association

5. Prof. Helen Roy MBE, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford

The provisional full programme is available here

Registration

Registration on the day opens at 08:15am with the event starting promptly at 09:00am (please allow yourself enough time to Register).

Field trip

On Sunday 5th April 10:00-15:00, the IWNHAS will lead a mini-BioBlitz in the vicinity of Bembridge Harbour, with the hub based at Brading Haven Yacht Club, Embankment Road, St Helens, PO33 1XQ.

All are welcome.

Individuals and groups will lead excursions 10:00-12:30 to record as many different plant and animal species as possible. There will be summing-up of the days’ finds at 14:00. Sunday lunch may be booked at the club on 01983 872289 and there is a bar available. More details will be added soon.

Submit a poster or exhibition

Posters on the conference theme or more broadly on the natural history of the Isle of Wight are warmly invited. For posters, please download the Abstract submission form here.

Organisations interested in bringing small table-top exhibitions, that promote the conservation and management of the Island’s environment and natural history, should contact The Society on iwatchwildlife@gmail.com.

TRAVEL INFORMATION:

There is limited car parking available at The Riverside Centre. If parking at the Centre, you will need to enter your vehicle registration onto the touchscreen in Reception upon arrival.

TRAVELLING TO THE ISLE OF WIGHT:

Wightlink Ferries https://www.wightlink.co.uk/

Red Funnel Ferries https://www.redfunnel.co.uk/en/

Hovertravel https://www.hovertravel.co.uk/

PAY & DISPLAY CAR PARKING IN NEWPORT:

Seaclose Recreation Ground Newport, PO30 2QS- Long Stay 8am to 6pm

Newport Harbour Newport, PO30 2QR – Long Stay 8am to 6pm

County Hall Complex Newport, PO30 1UD – Long Stay 8am to 6pm

Little London Sea Street, Newport, PO30 5BW – (if arriving and parking before 8:30am, early bird all day parking tickets are available at £3.00)

PUBLIC TRANSPORT:

Island Buses – https://www.islandbuses.info/

Nearest bus stop:

Fairlee Road, Newport – served by the No.5 & 9

NEARBY ACCOMMODATION:

Premier Inn –https://www.premierinn.com/gb/en/hotels/england/isle-of-wight/newport/isle-of-wight-newport.html

One Holyrood B&B –https://www.oneholyrood.co.uk/bb-rooms/

Newport Quay Hotel B&B – https://newportquayhotel.co.uk/

Travelodge – https://www.travelodge.co.uk/hotels/338/Newport-Isle-of-Wight-hotel?WT.tsrc=GHA_Organic&utm_campaign=GHA_Newport%2C%20Isle%20of%20Wight&utm_medium=GHA_Organic&utm_source=google

For additional places to stay on the Island please visit https://www.visitisleofwight.co.uk/accommodation

OTHER:

Further details on the Conference and BioBlitz will be made available here

Membership details of the Isle of Wight Natural History & Archaeological Society are available here

To our environmental impact there is no need to print your ticket for the event and the buffet lunch will be meat-free.

SAlmonid MAnagement Round the CHannel project 2017 – 2022 (SAMARCH)

What is the SAMARCH project about?

SAMARCH is a five-year project with a grant of €5.8m from the EU’s France Channel England Interreg Channel programme.

The SAMARCH project will provide new transferable scientific evidence to inform the management of salmon and sea trout (salmonids) in the estuaries and coastal waters of both the French and English sides of the Channel.  It will provide new information to further improve the models used in England and France to manage their salmonid stocks. Although the project involves working on a number of rivers in the Channel area, the majority of the data collection and research will focus on the five salmon and sea trout “Index” rivers in the Channel area. These are the rivers Frome and Tamar in the south of England and the Scorff, Oir and Bresle in northern France. SAMARCH is a five-year project with a grant of €5.8m from the EU’s France Channel England Interreg Channel programme. It involves 10 partners from France and England who are a blend of research and regulatory organisations, and key stakeholders:- 

  • Lead Partner: Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust (UK)
  • University of Exeter (UK)
  • Bournemouth University (UK)
  • Environment Agency (UK)
  • Salmon and Trout Conservation (UK)
  • Institut National de Recherche Agronomique (France)
  • Agrocampus Ouest (France)
  • Agence Française pour la Biodiversité (France)
  • Normandie Grands Migrateurs (France)
  • Bretagne Grands Migrateurs (France)

 There are four technical work-packages (WP T), a summary of their aims are:- 

  • Technical WP T 1, uses acoustic tracking technology to follow sea trout and salmon smolts through the estuaries of the rivers Frome, Tamar, Scorff and Bresle in the spring of 2018 and 2019 to apportion the mortality rate of smolts between the estuary and the sea. Using both acoustic and data storage tags in sea trout kelts in the Frome, Tamar and Bresle in the winters of 2017 and 2018, to track their movements through the estuary and around the coast.
  • Technical WP T 2, collects samples of juvenile brown trout from rivers in northern France and the south of England and adult sea trout across the Channel to build a common genetic data base of trout and sea trout to facilitate the identity of the river of origin of sea trout caught at sea. Genetic analysis to identify the sex of large numbers of juvenile and adult salmon and sea trout will feed into models used in the UK and France to manage salmonid stocks. To develop a transferable map based on sea scape in the Channel area to predict which coastal areas are important for sea trout.
  • Technical WP T 3, involves collecting data on the marine survival of salmonids and modelling this and historic data from the five Index rivers to develop a predictive model for the abundance of returning salmonids. Analysing large numbers of historical adult salmonid scales for changes in growth rates and sex ratio over time and assessing the fecundity of salmonids; these will all feed into the models used to manage salmonid stocks in England and France.
  • Technical WP T 4, will be used to ensure the results produced by the project inform, improve and develop new policies for the management of salmonids in estuaries and coastal waters. It will engage with stakeholders in both England and France and further afield to maximise the impact of the results generated by the project

Family Science Fair 15 March 1pm-5pm

Important information!

IMPORTANT EVENT UPDATE:
Family Science Fair has been postponed until further notice. If you have any questions please contact us directly.

This year, admittance to the Family Science Fair on 15 March will be by ticket only.

Tickets are FREE and can be obtained by going to the Dorchester Tourist Information Centre in person to collect (this is located in the Dorchester Library, Charles Street, DT1 1EE).

There will be 2 time slots available – from 1pm-3pm and from 3pm-5pm.

Tickets will be available from 15 Feb on a first come first served basis – keep an eye on here for updates!

In addition, the bug and exotic animal handling activity with World-Life will also require a ticket – which can be obtained when you collect a ticket for the Family Science Fair.

Due to high demand for this event we sincerely ask that if you collect a ticket but then are unable to go, that you return it to the Tourist Information Centre or pass it onto someone who is able to attend.

You will need your ticket on the day, to be admitted to the Family Science Fair.

We look forward to seeing you on the day – and have some brilliant activities lined up for you!