BU Photo of the week

This week’s photo of the week, ‘Peeping Capuchin,’ is by Aaron Hart, an Ecology and Wildlife conservation student from the faculty of Science and Technology.

“Going on the international field trip to Costa Rica as part of my course (Ecology & Wildlife Conservation) was truly inspiring. I found myself immersed in the whole experience, surrounded by an abundance of wildlife of which I took a keen interest to the white-faced Capuchin monkeys that roamed within the forests on Montezuma. Their behaviours and relationship with the local residents  fascinated me and I left wanting to study them further.

This led me to want to base my dissertation on them looking at observed differences found in behaviour between the wild and captive populations and how enrichment techniques can reduce stereotypical behaviour and preserve natural behaviours, essential for successful reintroduction’s. This involves working closely with local zoo’s and implementing a variety of enrichment techniques to test their effectiveness against stereotypical behaviour and then possibly going back to Costa Rica to volunteer in a monkey sanctuary of which I can observe natural behaviours in my time off. This also provides an opportunity to investigate further into the relationship between monkey and man and if their change of relationship over the years has led to a change in natural behaviours.”

Copyright: Research blog

BUtiful Bees

Spring has finally sprung, and we are seeing lots of bees on Bournemouth University (BU) campus. Dr Kathy Hodder photographed these yesterday. All the bees in the photos are female spring flying mining bees nesting within a very small area near the student village. She believes that all three 3 are collecting from dandelions.

How many species have you seen in your garden? Share your photos with us!

Fusion Inaugural Lecture – Limits of space and time: predicting how environmental change affects coastal birds

Ecological systems throughout the world are increasingly coming under threat from environmental changes, primarily caused by human actions. Understanding and predicting the effects of future change has proved a long-running problem for ecologists.

Coastal habitats, such as Poole Harbour, provide a vital habitat for many bird species but are particularly vulnerable to environmental change such as rising sea levels, habitat loss and disturbance from human activities. However, predicting the effect of such changes on these birds has proved difficult and has led to long-running conflicts between conservationists and other coastal groups.

Research by Professor Richard Stillman aims to reduce these conflicts by providing tools which enable the consequences of change to be accurately predicted. It does this by understanding the ways in which individual animals behave, the types of food they consume, how much they need to eat each day, and the ways in which human activities affect them.

During this inaugural lecture, Professor Stillman will explain how his research in this area has helped to predict the effects of changes in the UK and internationally and what it has meant for wildlife populations.

Doors open at 6:30pm and the lecture will begin at 7pm – tickets are free but booking is essential.

Ecological systems throughout the world are increasingly coming under threat from environmental changes, primarily caused by human actions. Understanding and predicting the effects of future change has proved a long-running problem for ecologists.

Coastal habitats, such as Poole Harbour, provide a vital habitat for many bird species but are particularly vulnerable to environmental change such as rising sea levels, habitat loss and disturbance from human activities. However, predicting the effect of such changes on these birds has proved difficult and has led to long-running conflicts between conservationists and other coastal groups.

Research by Professor Richard Stillman aims to reduce these conflicts by providing tools which enable the consequences of change to be accurately predicted. It does this by understanding the ways in which individual animals behave, the types of food they consume, how much they need to eat each day, and the ways in which human activities affect them.

During this inaugural lecture, Professor Stillman will explain how his research in this area has helped to predict the effects of changes in the UK and internationally and what it has meant for wildlife populations.

Doors open at 6:30pm and the lecture will begin at 7pm – tickets are free but booking is essential.

Book your tickets here:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/limits-of-space-and-time-predicting-how-environmental-change-affects-coastal-birds-tickets-59037963137?_eboga=1629113216.1495458698

Nature Volunteers

A new project has been launched in the Life and Environmental Sciences Department within the Faculty of Science and Technology at Bournemouth University.

The NatureVolunteers website links people interested in nature volunteering  with conservation organisations offering project opportunities that help nature.  Opportunities range from student placements to family fun and can be one-off or regular events. There are now over 100 projects to view and there will be lots more advertised soon. 

For more information visit the NatureVolunteers website:
 https://www.naturevolunteers.uk/ .Upcoming opportunities will be showcased on the News section on this website.

Ben Parker

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences

Microplastics, particles 1 µm-5 mm, are a relatively recent global stressor instigated by rapid human population growth and a consequent reliance on plastics. Particles originate from cosmetic products and the gradual breakdown of larger plastics and eventually reach water courses through surface runoff, wind dispersal and waste outflows. Microplastics are known to impact a range of aquatic organisms, impairing feeding, physiological and reproductive functions, with potentially detrimental consequences for biodiversity and conservation. Whilst many plastics pass through freshwaters, and then pass on to marine systems, the dynamics and consequences of freshwater microplastic are currently poorly understood. This FSBI funded project will therefore address existing knowledge gaps by quantifying the impacts of microplastics on focal freshwater fish and invertebrate taxa. Using novel field research (year 1) and laboratory experiments (years 2-3), I will investigate the individual and community impacts of microplastics on fish, including their disruptions to host-parasite systems. 

Supervisors: Demetra Andreou, Robert Britton, Iain Green

Research Links: LinkedIn, Twitter

BioBlitz Bournemouth

Hengistbury Head are delighted to present their 2019 BioBlitz event, the Great Wildlife Exploration.

Bioblitz 2019 event will be held in King’s Park, Bournemouth (BH7 7AF). It is an amazing opportunity for you to discover and connect with the wildlife right on your doorstep and unleash your inner scientist!

For the last 4 years we have held the Great Wildlife Exploration event at Hengistbury Head Local Nature Reserve, and it has given us a wonderful insight into the species we have on the reserve. However, we felt that it was time for a change, and that another green space deserved its time to shine!

King’s Park has a variety of habitats that have yet to be surveyed for wildlife. As a huge park in the Bournemouth area, the King’s Park Great Wildlife Exploration will give members of the public and experts alike a better understanding of local nature and increased familiarity with resident species.

Work alongside experts

Blitzers will work alongside experts within a 24-hour period (10am, 25th May to 10am, 26th May) to identify and record as many varied species of wildlife as can be found.

What’s happening

Saturday

The Saturday will host the majority of our activities: join wildlife experts on fantastic guided walks; from moths to mammals, there will be something for everyone!

There will also be stalls hosted by a range of participating organisations with fun family activities on throughout the day.

This is a chance to explore your local park and search for wildlife using real scientific techniques.

We will also be running interactive workshops and craft tables.

You can ask the experts questions, create your own environment-themed masterpieces and spend some quality time out in nature.

Sunday

Start the day with wildlife! Join us for a special 6am dawn chorus bird walk.

Full programme

Download our poster to explore the full programme.

Be part of something special

Your discoveries will contribute to the knowledge base on our local biodiversity!

No prior experience is needed, and all ages are welcome – but children aged 15 and below should be supervised by an adult.

For more information or to sneak a peek at our preparations, find us on Facebook and Instagram.

Source: Hengistbury Head

Lucile Crété

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences

The Omo-Turkana basin (Kenya/ Ethiopia) is a key reference region for human evolutionary studies, and provides a detailed record of vertebrate evolutionary patterns. Several aspects of hominins’ ecology and habitats can be investigated using fossils preserved here, as well as global climate and regional environmental processes that drove our evolution.

My research project aims at reconstructing prevailing vegetation conditions through time in the Omo-Turkana basin between 3.5 and 1.6 million years ago, by examining the dietary evidence of the fossil impala (genus Aepyceros) and springbok (genus Antidorcas), through stable isotopes, mesowear and microwear evidence. Changes in the diets of the studied species are expected to be informative about larger-scale habitat and vegetation changes, due to the high dietary adaptability of these abundant mixed-feeding antelopes. A key part of this project will also be to assess the links between modern antelope diets and vegetation cover of the present landscapes, which will be quantified via remote sensing techniques

Research links: Researchgate, Academia, Linkedin

Supervisors: Sally Reynolds, Ross Hill, Philip Hopley

Lindsay Biermann

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences

My project is researching human disturbance and its effects on wildlife populations. The majority of my study is concentrated on migratory wintering waterfowl, brent geese (Branta bernicla) ​and wigeon (Anas penelope), on the Exe Estuary in Devon and their responses to various human related activities that take place on the Estuary. The aim is to identify how different types of human disturbance effect these waterfowl and whether human disturbance in general is affecting waterfowl survival. This research is being conducted through the combination of field observations of disturbance events and through the use of individual based modeling. With the combination of these factors the hope is to be able to identify thresholds for human disturbance that waterfowl are capable of experiencing before there is a population level effect. Results from this can then help to inform management as well as provide insight into understanding the effects of human disturbance on other animals. 

Research links: Linkedin

Supervisor: Professor Richard Stillman