SAlmonid MAnagement Round the CHannel project 2017 – 2022 (SAMARCH)

What is the SAMARCH project about?

SAMARCH is a five-year project with a grant of €5.8m from the EU’s France Channel England Interreg Channel programme.

The SAMARCH project will provide new transferable scientific evidence to inform the management of salmon and sea trout (salmonids) in the estuaries and coastal waters of both the French and English sides of the Channel.  It will provide new information to further improve the models used in England and France to manage their salmonid stocks. Although the project involves working on a number of rivers in the Channel area, the majority of the data collection and research will focus on the five salmon and sea trout “Index” rivers in the Channel area. These are the rivers Frome and Tamar in the south of England and the Scorff, Oir and Bresle in northern France. SAMARCH is a five-year project with a grant of €5.8m from the EU’s France Channel England Interreg Channel programme. It involves 10 partners from France and England who are a blend of research and regulatory organisations, and key stakeholders:- 

  • Lead Partner: Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust (UK)
  • University of Exeter (UK)
  • Bournemouth University (UK)
  • Environment Agency (UK)
  • Salmon and Trout Conservation (UK)
  • Institut National de Recherche Agronomique (France)
  • Agrocampus Ouest (France)
  • Agence Française pour la Biodiversité (France)
  • Normandie Grands Migrateurs (France)
  • Bretagne Grands Migrateurs (France)

 There are four technical work-packages (WP T), a summary of their aims are:- 

  • Technical WP T 1, uses acoustic tracking technology to follow sea trout and salmon smolts through the estuaries of the rivers Frome, Tamar, Scorff and Bresle in the spring of 2018 and 2019 to apportion the mortality rate of smolts between the estuary and the sea. Using both acoustic and data storage tags in sea trout kelts in the Frome, Tamar and Bresle in the winters of 2017 and 2018, to track their movements through the estuary and around the coast.
  • Technical WP T 2, collects samples of juvenile brown trout from rivers in northern France and the south of England and adult sea trout across the Channel to build a common genetic data base of trout and sea trout to facilitate the identity of the river of origin of sea trout caught at sea. Genetic analysis to identify the sex of large numbers of juvenile and adult salmon and sea trout will feed into models used in the UK and France to manage salmonid stocks. To develop a transferable map based on sea scape in the Channel area to predict which coastal areas are important for sea trout.
  • Technical WP T 3, involves collecting data on the marine survival of salmonids and modelling this and historic data from the five Index rivers to develop a predictive model for the abundance of returning salmonids. Analysing large numbers of historical adult salmonid scales for changes in growth rates and sex ratio over time and assessing the fecundity of salmonids; these will all feed into the models used to manage salmonid stocks in England and France.
  • Technical WP T 4, will be used to ensure the results produced by the project inform, improve and develop new policies for the management of salmonids in estuaries and coastal waters. It will engage with stakeholders in both England and France and further afield to maximise the impact of the results generated by the project

Family Science Fair 15 March 1pm-5pm

Important information!

This year, admittance to the Family Science Fair on 15 March will be by ticket only.

Tickets are FREE and can be obtained by going to the Dorchester Tourist Information Centre in person to collect (this is located in the Dorchester Library, Charles Street, DT1 1EE).

There will be 2 time slots available – from 1pm-3pm and from 3pm-5pm.

Tickets will be available from 15 Feb on a first come first served basis – keep an eye on here for updates!

In addition, the bug and exotic animal handling activity with World-Life will also require a ticket – which can be obtained when you collect a ticket for the Family Science Fair.

Due to high demand for this event we sincerely ask that if you collect a ticket but then are unable to go, that you return it to the Tourist Information Centre or pass it onto someone who is able to attend.

You will need your ticket on the day, to be admitted to the Family Science Fair.

We look forward to seeing you on the day – and have some brilliant activities lined up for you!

Fusion Professorial Lecture: Addressing the environmental crisis

With so many reports and news stories about the environmental issues we currently face, including climate change, biodiversity loss and plastic pollution, which problems should cause us most concern and how can we tackle them?

A Bournemouth University (BU) academic will talk at RNLI College on Thursday 13 February to address these issues in the first of a series of free public lectures. BU’s Professor of Marine Biology and Conservation, Rick Stafford, will launch the Fusion Professorial Lecture Series with his talk, ‘Addressing the environmental crisis: from reusable coffee cups to political reform, what really works?’

Rick, from the Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, said: “It’s vital we address the environmental crisis properly in the very near future. This talk will bring together my research over the last two years and present a timely message that it’s not too late to act, and give a positive vision of what the future could be like if we do.”

Using his research, Rick will demonstrate that plastic pollution is a real threat, but has been overemphasised in order to maintain the economic and political status quo. His findings also show that climate change and biodiversity loss need large systematic changes in economic and political thinking to be successfully tackled, although nature-based solutions such as tree planting and a respect for nature are also important.

Rick will demonstrate the benefits to biodiversity and society of changing our approach to economics, and show that necessary changes will be advantageous to most people, both in developed and developing countries.

Rick added: “It’s very timely, and hopefully it will inspire people to support the necessary changes we need at local, national and international levels.”

The Fusion Professorial Lecture Series is free and open to the public, with six planned throughout the year, and cover a wide range of topics from BU academics.

Rick Stafford’s research began studying rocky shores, and developed into mathematical and computer models of animal behaviour. He currently works on topics as diverse as marine protected areas, fisheries, artificial reefs, as well as climate change and biodiversity loss.

The free to attend lecture takes place on Thursday 13 February, 6:30pm, and is ticketed. You can register for tickets on Eventbrite.

Article source: BU Research Blog

PhD student publication:

Integrating an individual-based model with approximate Bayesian computation to predict the invasion of a freshwater fish provides insights into dispersal and range expansion dynamics

First author Victoria Dominguez Almela has successfully published a paper in the Biological Invasions Journal.

The full link to the journal can be found here:

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10530-020-02197-6

You can read the abstract here:

“Short-distance dispersal enables introduced alien species to colonise and invade local habitats following their initial introduction, but is often poorly understood for many freshwater taxa. Knowledge gaps in range expansion of alien species can be overcome using predictive approaches such as individual based models (IBMs), especially if predictions can be improved through fitting to empirical data, but this can be challenging for models having multiple parameters. We therefore estimated the parameters of a model implemented in the RangeShifter IBM platform by approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) in order to predict the further invasion of a lowland river (Great Ouse, England) by a small-bodied invasive fish (bitterling Rhodeus sericeus). Prior estimates for parameters were obtained from the literature and expert opinion. Model fitting was conducted using a time-series (1983 to 2018) of sampling data at fixed locations and revealed that for 5 of 11 model parameters, the posterior distributions differed markedly from prior assumptions. In particular, sub-adult maximum emigration probability was substantially higher in the posteriors than priors. Simulations of bitterling range expansion predicted that following detection in 1984, their early expansion involved a relatively high population growth rate that stabilised after 5 years. The pattern of bitterling patch occupancy was sigmoidal, with 20% of the catchment occupied after 20 years, increasing to 80% after 30 years. Predictions were then for 95% occupancy after 69 years. The development of this IBM thus successfully simulated the range expansion dynamics of this small-bodied invasive fish, with ABC improving the simulation precision. This combined methodology also highlighted that sub-adult dispersal was more likely to contribute to the rapid colonisation rate than expert opinion suggested. These results emphasise the importance of time-series data for refining IBM parameters generally and increasing our understanding of dispersal behaviour and range expansion dynamics specifically.”

Read more about Victoria’s research here:

Resourcing the Future for Wildlife in Dorset

Resourcing the Future for Wildlife in Dorset:
Brian Heppenstall, Senior Ranger at BCP council
Wednesday, 12 February 2020 at 13:00 (GMT)

Bringing together conservation organisations and local business

The interest in the future of our wildlife and related environmental issues is driving a great deal of behavioural changes, for example 72% of miliennials are willing to spend more on products from companies committed to positive social and environmental impact. In the US, those companies whose employees were given time to undertake charitable environmental work, found that 76% of staff felt better about their employers.

It is no wonder then, that businesses are working to adopt green credentials, visible to both their customer base and their employees, in order to drive success.

Through networking and showcasing, delegates at this conference, will explore problems for local wildlife conservation. There will be a focus on local case studies, and opportunities to seek new collaborations and find potential solutions.

This years key speakers, Dr Anjana Khatwa and Ben Hoare, will address one of the most important resources within any sector – the workforce, and principally the issue of societal representation in the conservation sector.

This conference will therefore look at two strands:

  • Encouraging links between conservation organisations and business to encourage partnerships and the provision of support/resources in the mutual interest of preserving the local environment
  • Employability, skills and diversity within the conservation sector (in Dorset)

PROGRAMME

Introduction/welcome

 Refreshments available 

The Importance of Wildlife Conservation in Dorset

Professor Rick Stafford – Bournemouth University

The Future Workforce: The Impact of Work Placements

Julie Gill, Placement Coordinator – Bournemouth University

Frances Jenkins, Placement Coordinator – Kingston Maurward College

Case Study, Short Film: Hengistbury Head Placement Scheme

Does Nature Conservation Represent Society

Key Speaker: Ben Hoare, Editorial Consultant, BBC Wildlife Magazine

Privilege and Permission: Being Brown in a White Landscape

Key Speaker: Dr Anjana Khatwa, Learning and Earth Science Specialist

Go Wild – Collaborate!

Introduction by Luke Rake, Principal and CEO of Kingston Maurward College

Nature Volunteers: Matching opportunities with resources

Rachel James, Wild Paths, Dorset Wildlife Trust

Ali Tuckey, Durlston Country Park

Puff Storey, 3 Sided Cube, Tech For Good

Lottie Forte J.P. Morgan, Volunteering and Community Relations

Guest Speaker Panel Q&A

Networking Opportunity and Buffet


A full programme will be published to attendees nearer the conference

Please arrive at 13:00 for a prompt 13:15 start

Refreshments and a buffet dinner will be provided

Pre-booking of parking is required and once the spaces have been booked, no further parking on campus will be available.

 #rfwDorset


For futher information on this event please contact brian.heppenstall@bcpcouncil.gov.uk

 How to get to BU: Directions, parking & maps

 Accommodation: The University has preferential rates with a number of local hotels, please quote Bournemouth University when booking to access these rates.  (Preferential rates are subject to availability and will be advised by the hotel at the time of booking)

Carlton Hotel
East Cliff Court Hotel
Miramar Hotel
The Green House Hotel

 Please note that before placing an order, you will be asked to agree to Bournemouth University’s terms and conditions (see below). Please read these terms carefully and make sure you understand them before ordering any Products.

Bournemouth University’s Online Event Terms and Conditions

 Photos may be taken at the event. If you do not want to appear in any photos, please notify a member of staff at the event. For further information on the use of photos and videos, please refer to our privacy policyDo you have questions about Resourcing the Future for Wildlife in Dorset? Contact Brian Heppenstall, Senior Ranger at BCP council

Book your place here now:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/resourcing-the-future-for-wildlife-in-dorset-tickets-75832273371

Living Labs Roadshow, Bournemouth University, Lansdowne Campus

Share your sustainable ideas and real-world solutions at our Living Labs roadshows.

BU is launching its ‘Living Labs’ initiative with two roadshow events that all staff – both academic and professional & support – and students are invited to.

Living Labs embeds sustainability through knowledge, engagement, collaboration and innovation. Within a BU context they are an opportunity for staff and students to research and test sustainable solutions to real-world challenges using our facilities on campus.

Current examples of Living Labs are the vegan menu offers in the Terrace Café or the honeybee colony that live on top of the Fusion Building. Another is the Biodome which provides a year-round controlled climate so research can be carried out, and offers a permanent base for students and staff to conduct experiments into a range of forensic, ecological and wildlife projects.

The Living Labs roadshows are being held as we want to find out about all the brilliant ideas and concepts we know our staff and students have. Whether you have an idea for a new product or marketing campaign or would like to use data from the university grounds themselves for research, we want to hear from you.

The roadshows will introduce the Living Labs concept and share successful Living Labs projects at BU. The event will involve presentations from those who have been involved with past projects, in addition to a collaborative workshop to suggest, discuss and maybe start a new project. It will be an excellent opportunity to meet and innovate with members of the BU community.

There will be a replica roadshow Wednesday 11 December in CG11, Talbot Campus for those who cannot attend.

Book online now:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/living-labs-roadshow-lansdowne-campus-tickets-83824897525

Young Coastal Scientists and Engineers Conference

About YCSEC 2020

Bournemouth University is pleased to host the 16th Young Coastal Scientists and Engineers Conference (YCSEC) on the 6th-7th April 2020. This annual conference brings together early career researchers and practitioners (such as PhD students, Post-Doc researchers and recently qualified professionals) from a variety of different disciplines, all concerned with the physical and biological processes within the coastal environment. In the past, this has included presentations on a diverse selection of topics, such as, but not limited to: marine renewables, impact of flooding and climate change, coastal erosion and morphological modelling, and effects of pollution.

YCSEC provides a unique opportunity for leading young coastal scientists and engineers working in academia and industry, to present their work and network with their peers in an informal setting. The conference incorporates presentations, along with opportunities to network and socialise, with an optional field trip.

Who Should Attend?

This conference welcomes post-graduate researchers (MSc and PhD Students), post-doctoral researchers, and those who consider themselves to be early career researchers. Junior practitioners working in both the public or private sector are also encouraged to attend. The interdisciplinary audience and subject area is designed to promote integration and research connections between scientists and engineers associated with coastal research and practice.

We are keen to highlight that not all of us are ‘young’ and that there is no age restriction for attendance at this conference.

Why Attend?

YCSEC is renowned for providing a welcoming and supporting environment to present and discuss research. It is a great opportunity to interact with a small community of researchers, allowing you to expand your knowledge and network.

Extended Abstract Deadline

The call for abstracts has been extended to the 13th January so there is still time to apply.

For more information, visit their website:
http://ycsec2020.com/index.html

Stepping into Nature – Dorset Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)

Stepping into Nature aims to help people be happier and healthier by connecting with nature.

This 3-year project funded by the National Community Fund uses Dorset’s natural and cultural landscape to provide activities and sensory rich places for older adults, including those living with dementia and their care partners. Our nature-themed activities – both indoors and out – help people find new places to go, learn new skills and meet like-minded people.

Stepping into Nature’s main areas of activity are:

  • Working with local organisations such as Dorset Wildlife Trust, Dorset Forest School and Dorset History Centre to support and fund the delivery of inclusive activities inspired by or within nature.
  • Providing funding for communities and organisations to help create more inclusive, accessible and enjoyable green spaces.
  • Training staff and volunteers, particularly those within environmental organisations, to become dementia friendly.

There are some exciting activities you can get involved with throughout January:

Breaking Ground: Female Archaeologists at Avebury

28 October – 18 December 2019
Atrium Gallery, Poole House, Talbot Campus, Bournemouth University – open to all.

Last year this exhibition marked the 100 year anniversary of some women gaining the right to vote in Britain. It brings to light the contributions made by female archaeologists in the twentieth century at Avebury’s Stone Circles & Henge, National Trust World Heritage Site and the wider archaeology field.

Curated by BU’s Damian Evans and Bethan Bailey. Staff and students in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bournemouth University have had a long and fruitful association with the Avebury WHS, and worked closely with National Trust staff and with many farmers and landowners who have kindly facilitated surveys and investigations.

A selection of objects from the Alexander Keiller Museum’s collection have been scanned and 3D printed for this exhibition, part of an MRes project by Bethan Bailey to investigate how archaeological objects can be made accessible to people with mobility difficulties.

Out in the landscape of Avebury, BU has been involved in several projects, including:

Extensive Geophysical Surveys
Discovery and plotting of many previously unrecognized sites in partnership with the Deutsches Archäologisches Institute and the National Trust.

Between the Monuments / Living with the monuments
Investigating the character of human settlement in the Avebury landscape, Arts and Humanities Research Council funded collaboration.

Virtual Avebury
A 3D fully immersive VR simulation of prehistoric Avebury allows participants inside the model to experience the site as never before. Collaborative project with BU, National Trust Daden Ltd and Satsymph, funded by AHRC/ Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

Human Henge at Avebury
A multi-disciplinary Heritage Lottery Fund project investigating the value of historic landscapes as a way of the enhancing mental health well-being of people with long-term mental health issues.

The Breaking Ground exhibition was created by the Alexander Keiller Museum in Avebury who have kindly loaned it to the University for display. It has been produced in association with the National Trust and TrowelBlazers. We are delighted to host this celebrative exhibition; it will be on display in the Atrium Gallery, Poole House, Talbot campus until 18 December 2019.