Alice Hall

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences 

My PhD entitled “The Ecology and Ecological Enhancement of Artificial Coastal Structures” examines the communities associated with coastal artificial structures and trials ways in which we can improve the habitat provided for marine organisms. I have studied the benthic communities associated with wooden and rock groynes, the impacts artificial structures have on the surrounding fish communities and the connectivity of larvae dispersal between natural and artificial habitats. My ecological enhancement trials have included increasing the surface texture of rock armour and monitoring artificial rockpools (VertipoolsTM) on seawalls.

 

Research links: Twitter, LinkedIn

Supervisor: Dr Roger Herbert

Jessica Bone

MRes student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences 

Lagoons are a rare ecosystem in the UK and occur on just 5.3% of Europe’s coastline. The lagoonal environment is highly variable and salinity and temperature can change dramatically over a small spatial scale. Consequently, the fauna associated with lagoons is well adapted to surviving such extreme conditions.

When lagoons are man-made and within an urban setting, there is a need for careful management to reduce issues that affect the local public and their attitudes towards the lagoon. Poole Park boating lake is one such example, and has suffered macroalgal blooms that interfere with boat use, swarms of midges, and persistent eggy smells. This research will comprehensively map the distribution of Poole Park lagoon’s benthic invertebrates and determine the environmental factors influencing their distribution, including salinity, particle size and organic matter content. The lagoon specialist starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis will be focused on given its protected and cryptic status within the UK.  The spatial distribution of the non-native Australian tubeworm Ficopomatus enigmaticus will be mapped and the interaction of its calcareous reef structure with the native fauna will be investigated using sampling of the reef itself and in-situ video footage.

The results from this data will inform an overall assessment of Poole Park lagoon’s ecosystem health and inform suggested management measures. It will also add to the current data for the non-native Australian tubeworm’s distribution in the UK, its effect in one it’s rarest ecosystems, and its interaction with its equally rare fauna.

Research links: Linkedin

Supervisor: Dr Roger Herbert 

Richard Rowley

MRes student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Archaeology, Anthropology & Forensic Science

My research begins with investigating the accuracy, precision and resolution of Structure from Motion (SfM) – 3D computational modelling using photographs – for recording cultural heritage at both object and site level. The practicalities of using SfM alongside other spatially referenced datasets, within the wider suite of contemporary geomatics, will then be explored, considering underwater and intertidal sites alongside those on dry land. In the longer term, I will be exploring the potential applications of such datasets to computational modelling for the management of cultural heritage in-situ: monitoring, and possibly predicting, change over time. I specialise in using digital technologies to investigate and promote the historic environment, in particular within the coastal and marine sectors. Although my work can involve cultural heritage from any era or area, I am especially interested in post-industrial revolution Europe and in maritime, aviation and contemporary conflict archaeologies. Many of my case studies are in Hampshire, Dorset and Normandy; frequently investigating D-Day and its preparations.

Research links: tbc

Supervisor: Dave Parham 

Emily Winter

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences 

Emily Winter’s research interests focus on ecosystem ecology and freshwater fish behavioural ecology. She is working towards a PhD on the effects of a biomanipulation programme on the population dynamics and behaviour of lowland river fish in the Norfolk Broads, principally using acoustic telemetry and stable isotope analysis. Her wider interests include environmental change​ and conservation biology in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

 

 

Research links: ResearchGate

Supervisor: Professor Robert Britton

Emma Nolan

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences 

‘Reconciling fisheries with conservation: quantifying recreational values of non-native fishes with their consequences for native biodiversity’This unique project utilises Severn Basin Predator Fisheries as a model system to study the ecological and trophic interactions of co-occurring native and invasive, large-bodied piscivorous fishes, pike (Esox lucius) and zander (Sander lucioperca), in England. Data are gathered through non-destructive sampling and monitoring techniques including stable isotope analysis and acoustic telemetry, with sample collection in collaboration with local predator anglers. The project also has a socio-ecological element whereby angler motivations, behaviour and levels of participation are assessed to highlight the value of fisheries based on non-native fishes. ​

Research links: ResearchGate, Linkedin, Twitter

Supervisors: Professor Robert Britton, Dr Susanna Curtin

 

Victoria Dominguez Almela

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences 

The impact of invasive species has resulted in large losses in the biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems. Predicting how climate change will affect the invasiveness of species could be essential for developing appropriate environmental management measures. This project will cover the study of the dispersal mechanisms of invasive species using individual based models. They are increasingly powerful tools for exploring ecological interactions in changing environments and within spatial and regulatory contexts. We aim to include the effects of climate change and the interactions between invasive and native species.

This research will be a first attempt to use those kinds of models for freshwater invasive fish species in England. They have not been applied yet to understanding how climate change and management interventions interact to affect the invasion probabilities of non-native fishes. It is a very exciting project and a fulfill challenge that I am so happy to undertake. It is still the beginning of the journey since I just started my PhD at Bournemouth University, but I will be very pleased of keeping you all updated with any advances during my research.

Research links: tbc

Supervisor: Professor Robert Britton

Kelly van Leeuwen

PhD student at Bournemouth University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Life and Environmental Sciences 

Kelly’s PhD study investigates the minimal landscape requirements and constraints for hominids (i.e. chimpanzees and early hominins) in order to determine how flexibly hominids can adapt to changing environments. This information can be used to identify the impacts of landscape changes on hominid behaviour, adaptation and survival, and to provide a framework for understanding the underlying reasons for adaptation and evolution of hominids in open habitats. Because it is difficult to observe an individual’s responses to present, past, and future landscape changes directly, Kelly’s PhD study will use an individual-based modelling approach based on hominid-habitat relationships from field studies. This approach allows individuals to virtually interact with different environments and different landscape change scenarios based on rules from published literature.

Research links: https://go-leap.wixsite.com/home/kvleeuwen-proj.

Supervisors: Professor Amanda Korstjens, Professor Ross Hill