International Women’s Day 2020

International Women’s Day 2020: Life and Environmental Science Researchers

Dr Catherine Gutmann Roberts is a postdoctoral researcher in fish migration ecology. Postdoc researching migration ecology and phenology across a range of taxa, but with a keen interest in freshwater and diadromous fishes. She is interested in all aspects of aquatic ecology and conservation, enjoys working with citizen scientists (anglers) to collect data and samples. She also has a passion for science communication and public engagement in research.

Victoria Dominguez Almela is assessing the ‘dispersal-enhancing’ traits of non-native fish species in their invasion range to quantify the importance of trait plasticity in driving natural rates of diffusion. Progress to date has included completion of swimming performance using flume tanks (as shown in the picture) and functional response experiments. Results are promising, but work is still in progress!

Professor Amanda Korstjens and her mother pictured here, who was 78 years young when she went to Indonesia on a Student Environment Research Team (SERT) training trip with Bournemouth University students. Her research topics include: I. How climate and human disturbance influence primate distribution patterns and survival; 2. Eco-tourism, conservation, disease transmission and human-wildlife conflicts; 3. The evolution of mating strategies and female sexual signals, esp. in red colobus monkeys. You can find all her brilliant research activities on the Landscape Ecology and Primatology (LEAP) website: https://go-leap.wixsite.com/home

Professor Anita Diaz and some of the Purbeck Wildlife Student Environment Research Team (SERT) are based at Bournemouth University. The SERT project helps research what habitat management most helps wildlife conservation on the Purbeck Heaths National Nature Reserve. It runs each year, mentored by Anita Diaz and working in close collaboration with the National Trust. They also collaborate with a range of other conservation organisations including the RSPB and Back from the Brink.

The Nature Volunteers website https://www.naturevolunteers.uk/  is a HEIF funded project that connects people wishing to volunteer to help nature with volunteering opportunities offered by conservation organisations all over the UK. It is also a research tool that helps us, and conservation organisations understand what people who are new to nature volunteering are looking for and what encourages their engagement. ​

Dr Alice Hall is a postdoctoral researcher working at Bournemouth University. She specializes in marine biology and ecological engineering. Her work focuses on building multifunctional structures which can perform their primary function and also provide suitable habitat for marine life.  She is currently working on an Interreg Atlantic Project called 3DPARE which is 3D printing concrete artificial reef units for use in the Atlantic region.

Katie Thompson is doctoral researcher in African Elephant conservation. Her research focuses on ecosystem level conservation environmental education and sustainable development. Ultimately, she aims to use this knowledge to facilitate improving long term management of wildlife and their natural habitats, through high impact research and outreach activities. 

Professor Genoveva Esteban’s research interests focus on biodiversity at the microbial level in order to understand and predict the functioning of aquatic systems by characterising microbial biodiversity at local and regional scales, and by defining the role played by microbes in the natural environment and food webs. Her research is two fold: (1) she leads a successful programme that aims to link science with conservation through research on `cryptic’ biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems; (2) characterisation at molecular and morphological levels of the rare aquatic microbial consortia that thrive in wet woodlands, some being new species to science. She is also a dynamic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Ambassador.

Jessica Bone is a marine biologist and Research Assistant for the Marineff project and based at Bournemouth University (UK) where she also studied both my Bachelors and Masters degrees in marine ecology. She has enjoyed the interdisciplinary element of Marineff as it has given her the opportunity to learn more about engineering and materials science which has complemented my contributions in designing the Marineff pool. She is also responsible for the Marineff newsletter. Having grown up and studied on the south coast of the UK, she champions British marine wildlife and has a soft spot for the intertidal invertebrates. She is also a secretary for the Poole Harbour Study Group.