North African long billed Pterosaur fed like modern wading birds

A new species of pterosaur about the size of a Turkey has been discovered by UK researchers. About 110 million years old, this strange finding is key to understanding the true diversity of these ancient winged reptiles.


Discovered in Morocco, North Africa, the remains belonged to a small winged reptile, or pterosaur, called Leptostomia bagaaensis which lived during the middle cretaceous period, between 94 and 113 million years ago. The fossil consists of a pair of long, toothless and flattened jaws, which bear resemblance to the beak of a curlew, a type of wading bird common on British coastline.

The long, sensitive beak of Leptostomia would have been used to probe for aquatic prey
(© J. Dazley)

Although it is a common beak shape in birds, it was previously unheard of in pterosaurs, and originally was not thought to belong to a pterosaur at all. When researchers at the universities of Bath and Portsmouth analysed the mandibles, CT scanning revealed a network of internal canals – surface compressions across the surface of the beak – similar to those found in wading birds such as curlews and sand pipers. This made the beak highly sensitive to touch and it is very likely that this pterosaur could use its beak to detect prey.


Despite being a desert environment now, the Kem Kem formation of Morocco, where the specimen was found, would have been a rich habitat in the mid cretaceous period, consisting of rivers and estuaries. So this pterosaur, attracted to the area by the rich source of prey, would likely flock in large numbers, sifting through the water and probing for prey such as aquatic insects.


This is a really exciting find for researchers because it has revealed new feeding behaviours previously unknown in pterosaurs, further unearthing the diversity of these reptiles.

Leptostomia bagaaensis (© M. Jacobs, University of Portsmouth)