Lake Oleiden: A Biodiversity Hotspot in Kenya

Whilst in Kenya, one project that the team was carrying out was an ecological survey of freshwater microbes in several different locations across Kenya, and whether the diversity of microbes correlated at all with the diversity of animals species seen. One such location which was sampled was Lake Oleiden, which proved to be a hotspot for wildlife.

Lake Oleiden is located next to the much larger Lake Naivasha, from which it has recently separated, and is slightly saline in nature. The lakes are home to many fish species, a whole host of water birds, and hippopotamus. The water samples collected showed that the lake is rich in phytoplankton (microscopic plants) and many species of flagellates, tiny single-celled organisms which use a tail-like appendage called a flagellum to move around in the water. Flagellates and phytoplankton are important sources of food for tiny invertebrates such as water fleas and copepods, which are in turn eaten by small fish.

Just a small sample of the waterbird species seen: great white pelican, pink-backed pelican, long-tailed cormorant and great cormorant

As a result, there was an incredible diversity of fish-eating bird species, with over 10 different species of bird seen on the lake. There were two species of cormorant seen, and they had established several nesting sites at the banks of the lake, supporting one of the largest congregations of these birds in the country, according to our local guide. Also present were several flocks of great white pelican (pictured within a multi-species community with cormorants and gulls), which were seen feeding alongside terns, gulls and a pair of pied kingfisher, which we were lucky enough to see hunting for fish. At the shore of the lake were a variety of herons and storks including the little egret, marabou stork, yellow-billed stork and the black heron, which has an ingenious hunting strategy, using its wings as shade, attracting fish for it to catch. The lake is also home to the impressive African fish eagles, seen swooping to catch fish from the water’s surface.

This great diversity can be sourced back to the microbes. They provide food for tiny invertebrates which are in turn consumed by the fish in the lake. And of course it is the fish which attract the birds to the area, promising a rich source of food, and by extension, a suitable breeding ground for several species.

Manure Mondays…

On a rainy Monday (05/03/2018) in Kenya, 1000 litres of cow manure arrived on site in barrels and ready to be put into action. The anaerobic biodigester depends on a series of biological processes in which microorganisms break down biodegradable material in the absence of oxygen. One of the end products is biogas, which will be combusted to generate electricity and heat for the school. We’re using the manure to kick start the biodigesters in the green toilets which will allow us to convert human waste into biogas.

Along with the arrival of the manure, work on site is making steady progress. The foundations for the structure are now underway which will hold the steel frame structure in place. The skeleton assemblage of the structure has also began, with steel beams being welded together off site. The next step is to get the structure to the site…